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10 healthy food swaps to help with weight loss






1. Spiralled vegetables instead of pasta


While a pasta dish can still be healthy (and delicious!), swapping spaghetti for spiralised vegetables can be a way to add extra fibre and nutrients to a meal.


Try spiralised zucchini, carrots, beetroot, or cucumber for a lower-carb, lower-calorie meal. While a cup of cooked spaghetti is 200 calories, a cup of zucchini noodles is just 35 calories.



2. Flavoured fizzy water instead of soft drink


Not only does soft drink contain around 10 teaspoons of sugar in each can but they often contain artificial colours and flavours which can cause gut problems.


Swap to a zero sugar option by drinking soda water with lemon, lime or mint instead and save around 140 calories.



3. Greek yoghurt instead of sour cream


Greek yoghurt is a great alternative to sour cream as it still provides a creamy texture and slightly acidic flavour similar to sour cream.


While 100g of full fat sour cream contains 21g of fat and 214 calories, 100g of 0% fat free Greek yoghurt contains 0g fat and only 65 calories.



4. Frozen nice cream instead of ice cream


If you haven’t heard of this simple and tasty ice cream alternative, you are in for a treat! Just freeze overripe bananas and blend for a healthy, low sugar ice cream alternative.


While a tub of ice cream contains sugar, additives and preservatives, ‘nice’ cream contains just 1 ingredient- banana! Not only that but a cup of ice cream contains around 350 calories and 20g added sugar whereas a cup of ‘nice’ cream contains around 200 calories and no added sugar.


For recipe inspiration try out these healthy ‘nice’ cream desserts: https://minimalistbaker.com/easy-banana-ice-cream-tips-2-methods-10-flavors/




5. Untoasted muesli instead of toasted muesli

While toasted muesli appears to be a healthy option, it’s made by tossing oats with sweeteners such as honey, maple syrup or sugar (along with oil and salt for flavour) and then toasted. So while it might taste good, it’s loaded with plenty of added sugar.

On the other hand, untoasted muesli is simply raw oats, with nuts, seeds and dried fruit.


For a healthy option, use untoasted muesli for a breakfast cereal lower in sugar and saturated fat.



6. Salsa instead of tomato sauce


Package sauces can contain hidden added sugar, adding extra unneeded sugar to a meal.


Instead of tomato sauce grab a tub of salsa to add some flavour to food instead. Both feature tomato as the base, but while the ketchup will contain sugar or other sweeteners, salsa is simply made of tomatoes, onion, red peppers and some vinegar.


Not only is the salsa lower in sugar, but as it contains vegetables it’s higher in fibre too.




7. Cauliflower rice instead of rice


A side of cauliflower rice with your curry can be a great lower-carb option that also adds fibre and nutrients to a meal.


Simply grate cauliflower with a box grate or in your food processor, and cook in boiling water for one minute.


Cauliflower only has 48 calories per 200g, whereas rice has 260 calories.



8. Dark chocolate covered almonds instead of a milk chocolate bar


Dark chocolate is lower in sugar compared to milk chocolate, plus it contains beneficial antioxidants. A milk chocolate bar also typically contains more additives, colouring and flavourings compared to dark chocolate, making it a more processed option.


By choosing 2-3 dark chocolate covered almonds instead of a milk chocolate bar you will be consuming less sugar and other additives, plus you’d be getting the nutrients found in almonds including healthy fats and some calcium.



9. Lean sausages instead of 3 star


While sausages have a reputation for being unhealthy, it’s certainly possible to choose a healthier option. Lean meats such as chicken, turkey and kangaroo are lower in saturated fat while still being a tasty option.


One chicken sausage is around 90 calories and contains 4g of fat while one beef sausage contains 150 calories and 12g of fat.



10. Potato chips for plain popcorn


If you are craving something crunchy, a healthier snack option is a cup of air-popped corn. Not only is popcorn considered a wholegrain, but it’s a source of fibre. Comparatively, potato chips are higher in salt, fat and calories.


A cup of air-popped popcorn is 30 calories and 0g saturated fat, compared to a cup of potato chips that contain around 150 calories and 2g saturated fat.


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